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HELP US URGE THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMISSION TO SCHEDULE A PUBLIC HEARING ON ASTOR COURT! See action steps below...

 


Photograph by Henrik Olund

STEP 1: Sign an online petition calling on LPC to hold a public hearing and email it to your friends and neighbors!

STEP 2: Send a letter to LPC Chair Robert B. Tierney. Click here for contact information and here to view sample letters.
 
STEP 3: Send copies of your letter to key political officials. Click here for a contact list.
 
 

ASTOR COURT
Broadway between 89th and 90th Streets
Charles A. Platt, 1914-16

Robert A.M. Stern calls Astor Court "perhaps the loveliest of all the courtyard apartments built between 1900 and the First World War," a nice compliment since the arrangement of apartments around a central courtyard places this building in the company of such august West Side landmarks as the Apthorp (Clinton & Russell, 1906-08) and the Belnord (Hiss & Weekes, 1908-09). Astor Court occupies the full block front along Broadway. Residents accessed their homes via the interior garden with entrances on West 89th and 90th Streets. Charles A. Platt - architect, landscape architect and artist - frequently collaborated with the Astors, who by the time they commissioned Astor Court had amassed one of New York's largest fortunes, mainly in real estate. In 1912, John Jacob Astor IV perished aboard the Titanic, leaving his son, Vincent, to take over the family business. Astor Court was one of Vincent Astor's first large-scale development projects. He went on to establish the influential Vincent Astor Foundation, which became a major cultural force under the leadership of his wife, Brooke Astor (Vincent Astor died in 1959). The most impressive exterior feature of this 13-story, Italian-palazzo-style building is its immense, classically styled cornice, originally painted in gold and red to recall ancient monuments. So many unprotected apartment buildings have been stripped of their monumental tops, making Astor Court's boldly projecting cornice a landmark on the Broadway skyline.

 
 
Click below for recent press:
"The Astor Legacy in Brick and Stone," by Christopher Gray. The New York Times, Sep 10, 2006.
"In a 1916 Astor Building, A Private Garden Grows," by Christopher Gray. The New York Times, Jul 1, 2001.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hon. Robert B. Tierney, Chair

NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor, NYC 10007
Email: comments@lpc.nyc.gov
Fax: 212-669-7955
Phone: 212-669-7888
 
Honorable Thomas K. Duane
New York State Senator
322 Eighth Avenue, Suite 1700, NYC 10001
Email: duane@senate.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-633-8096
Phone: 212-633-8052
 
Honorable Linda B. Rosenthal
New York State Assembly Member
230 West 72nd Street, Suite 2F, NYC 10023
Email: rosentl@assembly.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-873-6520
Phone: 212-873-6368
 
Honorable Richard Gottfried
New York State Assembly Member
250 Broadway, Room 2232, NYC 10007
Email: gottfried@assembly.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-312-1494
Phone: 212-312-1492
 
Honorable Scott Stringer
Manhattan Borough President
1 Centre Street, 19th Floor, NYC 10007
Email: bp@manhattanbp.org
Fax: 212-669-4900
Phone: 212-669-8300
 
Honorable Gale A. Brewer
New York City Council Member
563 Columbus Avenue, NYC 10024
Email: gale.brewer@council.nyc.ny.us
Fax: 212-873-0279
Phone: 212-873-0282
 
Honorable Christine Quinn
City Council Speaker
224 West 30th Street, Suite 1206, NYC 10001
Email: quinn@council.nyc.ny.us
Fax: 212-564-7347
Phone: 212-564-7757
 
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