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HELP US URGE THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMISSION TO SCHEDULE A PUBLIC HEARING ON THE BROADWAY FASHION BUILDING! See action steps below...

 

STEP 1: Sign an online petition calling on LPC to hold a public hearing and email it to your friends and neighbors!

STEP 2: Send a letter to LPC Chair Robert B. Tierney. Click here for contact information and here to view sample letters.
 
STEP 3: Send copies of your letter to key political officials. Click here for a contact list.
 
 

BROADWAY FASHION BUILDING
Broadway and 84th Street
Sugarman & Berger, 1930-31

The Broadway Fashion Building has been turning heads since it was built in the early 1930s. Its Art Deco style and materials give this sleek, four-story structure an appeal and distinction that belies its modest size. The AIA Guide to New York City Architecture (Norval White and Elliot Willensky, 4th ed., 2000) describes its significance as follows: "Long before the curtain walls of metal and glass descended upon midtown, this curtain wall of metal and glass and glazed terra cotta came to grace Broadway." Architects Sugarman & Berger, prolific designers of both residential and commercial buildings throughout New York City, caught the critics' attention in their day as well. As the Broadway Fashion Building was under construction, The New York Times remarked that the "façades will be 90 per cent glass, with white stainless metal for decorative work," in vivid contrast to neighboring buildings of solid masonry. The Times also noted that "a system of exterior and interior illumination will give the structure an unusual appearance at night." The building was intended to glow in the evening, while during the day the nearly all-glass design allowed natural light to reach the high-end retail shops on each of the floors.

Click below for recent press:
"The Astor Legacy in Brick and Stone," by Christopher Gray. The New York Times, Sep 10, 2006.
"In a 1916 Astor Building, A Private Garden Grows," by Christopher Gray. The New York Times, Jul 1, 2001.
 
 

Hon. Robert B. Tierney, Chair

NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor, NYC 10007
Email: comments@lpc.nyc.gov
Fax: 212-669-7955
Phone: 212-669-7888
 
Honorable Thomas K. Duane
New York State Senator
322 Eighth Avenue, Suite 1700, NYC 10001
Email: duane@senate.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-633-8096
Phone: 212-633-8052
 
Honorable Linda B. Rosenthal
New York State Assembly Member
230 West 72nd Street, Suite 2F, NYC 10023
Email: rosentl@assembly.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-873-6520
Phone: 212-873-6368
 
Honorable Richard Gottfried
New York State Assembly Member
250 Broadway, Room 2232, NYC 10007
Email: gottfried@assembly.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-312-1494
Phone: 212-312-1492
 
Honorable Scott Stringer
Manhattan Borough President
1 Centre Street, 19th Floor, NYC 10007
Email: bp@manhattanbp.org
Fax: 212-669-4900
Phone: 212-669-8300
 
Honorable Gale A. Brewer
New York City Council Member
563 Columbus Avenue, NYC 10024
Email: gale.brewer@council.nyc.ny.us
Fax: 212-873-0279
Phone: 212-873-0282
 
Honorable Christine Quinn
City Council Speaker
224 West 30th Street, Suite 1206, NYC 10001
Email: quinn@council.nyc.ny.us
Fax: 212-564-7347
Phone: 212-564-7757
 
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