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HELP US URGE THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMISSION TO SCHEDULE A PUBLIC HEARING ON EUCLID HALL! See action steps below...

 



STEP 1: Sign an online petition calling on LPC to hold a public hearing and email it to your friends and neighbors!

STEP 2: Send a letter to LPC Chair Robert B. Tierney. Click here for contact information and here to view sample letters.
 
STEP 3: Send copies of your letter to key political officials. Click here for a contact list.
 
 

EUCLID HALL
2345 Broadway between 85th and 86th Streets
Hill and Turner, 1900

"[A]mong the most ambitious apartment houses of its time," according to Christopher Gray, Euclid Hall is a prime example of advanced multiple-dwelling design at the turn of the 20th century. The seven-story building occupies Broadway's entire block front between 85th and 86th Streets. Deep, narrow courtyards penetrate the otherwise massive bulk of the façade, making it appear to be three separate buildings at first glance and allowing light and air into apartments at various points around the perimeter. The basement once housed a large restaurant and cafe. But, unlike the later buildings, including Astor Court and the Cornwall, the ground floor of Euclid Hall was not originally designed for retail uses, despite its ideal situation near a stop on the new IRT subway line. Like their contemporaries at the Ansonia and the Dorilton, built further south along Broadway at about the same time, Euclid Hall's developers believed that shops would undermine the building's elegance. In keeping with then-current fashion, architects Hill & Turner used French-style ornament (red brick embellished with light-colored limestone and iron details) to augment the sophistication of their design. The building's promoters called it "New York's Finest Family Apartment," playing to an upper-middle-class market that was increasingly interested in apartment living and the cutting-edge buildings that were transforming Broadway. Hill & Turner's floorplan, so modern at the time, soon became outmoded. Euclid Hall was converted for single-room-occupancy use in the 1930s.

Click below for recent press:
"Euclid Hall; A Derelict Dowager Making a Modest Comeback," by Christopher Gray. The New York Times, July 29, 1990

 

 
 
 

Hon. Robert B. Tierney, Chair

NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor, NYC 10007
Email: comments@lpc.nyc.gov
Fax: 212-669-7955
Phone: 212-669-7888
 
Honorable Thomas K. Duane
New York State Senator
322 Eighth Avenue, Suite 1700, NYC 10001
Email: duane@senate.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-633-8096
Phone: 212-633-8052
 
Honorable Linda B. Rosenthal
New York State Assembly Member
230 West 72nd Street, Suite 2F, NYC 10023
Email: rosentl@assembly.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-873-6520
Phone: 212-873-6368
 
Honorable Richard Gottfried
New York State Assembly Member
250 Broadway, Room 2232, NYC 10007
Email: gottfried@assembly.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-312-1494
Phone: 212-312-1492
 
Honorable Scott Stringer
Manhattan Borough President
1 Centre Street, 19th Floor, NYC 10007
Email: bp@manhattanbp.org
Fax: 212-669-4900
Phone: 212-669-8300
 
Honorable Gale A. Brewer
New York City Council Member
563 Columbus Avenue, NYC 10024
Email: gale.brewer@council.nyc.ny.us
Fax: 212-873-0279
Phone: 212-873-0282
 
Honorable Christine Quinn
City Council Speaker
224 West 30th Street, Suite 1206, NYC 10001
Email: quinn@council.nyc.ny.us
Fax: 212-564-7347
Phone: 212-564-7757
 
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