HELP US URGE THE LANDMARKS PRESERVATION COMMISSION TO SCHEDULE A PUBLIC HEARING ON THE WEST END AVENUE STUDY AREA! See action steps below... 

  STEP 1: Sign an online petition calling on LPC to hold a public hearing and email it to your friends and neighbors! Click here.
 
STEP 2: Send a letter to LPC Chair Robert B. Tierney. Click here for contact information and here to view sample letters.
 
STEP 3: Send copies of your letter to key political officials. Click here for a contact list.
 

WEST END AVENUE STUDY AREA
70th to 109th Street, Riverside Drive to Broadway

West End Avenue forms the spine of this area, which vividly tells the story of the development of the Upper West Side from the 1880s to the 1930s. This once rural and isolated part of Manhattan changed rapidly in response to transportation improvements - namely, the Ninth Avenue elevated train (1879) and the IRT subway (1904). Riverside Drive was created in 1900 and became a fashionable address boasting grand townhouses and free-standing mansions. Broadway exhibits a variety of building styles and heights. West End Avenue, by contrast, offers a cohesive picture: a strikingly consistent streetwall of uniform cornice heights, harmonious materials and creative interpretations of historical styles, including Arts and Crafts, Beaux Arts and Art Deco and showcasing the work of many of the city's most prolific, if less recognized architects, such as Schwartz & Gross, Neville & Bagge, and George & Edward Blum.

Tucked between the major avenues are rowhouse-lined midblocks. Significant figures in the film and music worlds lived and worked in the area, including George Gershwin, Humphrey Bogart, and Marion Davies. For years, 106th Street has been called the "Street of Jazz" after Duke Ellington, who owned three townhouses on the block.

Together this ensemble of buildings creates a rich and architecturally diverse visual streetscape that deserves to be designated a historic district.

Click here to read LW!'s statement of support for a West End Avenue historic district, presented at Community Board 7's May 8, 2008 meeting

Press
"A Preservation Handbook in a Few Short Blocks," by Christopher Gray. The New York Times, Jun 24, 2007
"The Marble Manor Turkish Tobacco Built," by Christopher Gray. The New York Times, May 4, 1997
"If You're Thinking of Living in: Upper West Side," by Kathleen M. Berry. The New York Times, Mar 4, 1990
"780 West End Avenue; Making a Tall Building Taller," by Christopher Gray. The New York Times, May 14, 1989



Hon. Robert B. Tierney, Chair

NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission
1 Centre Street, 9th Floor, NYC 10007
Email: comments@lpc.nyc.gov
Fax: 212-669-7955
Phone: 212-669-7888
Click here for a sample letter from elected officials to Chair Tierney

Honorable Thomas K. Duane

New York State Senator
322 Eighth Avenue, Suite 1700, NYC 10001
Email: duane@senate.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-633-8096
Phone: 212-633-8052

Honorable Linda B. Rosenthal
New York State Assembly Member
230 West 72nd Street, Suite 2F, NYC 10023
Email: rosentl@assembly.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-873-6520
Phone: 212-873-6368

Honorable Richard Gottfried

New York State Assembly Member
250 Broadway, Room 2232, NYC 10007
Email: gottfried@assembly.state.ny.us
Fax: 212-312-1494
Phone: 212-312-1492

Honorable Scott Stringer
Manhattan Borough President
1 Centre Street, 19th Floor, NYC 10007
Email: bp@manhattanbp.org
Fax: 212-669-4900
Phone: 212-669-8300

Honorable Gale A. Brewer
New York City Council Member
563 Columbus Avenue, NYC 10024
Email: gale.brewer@council.nyc.ny.us
Fax: 212-873-0279
Phone: 212-873-0282

Honorable Christine Quinn

City Council Speaker
224 West 30th Street, Suite 1206, NYC 10001
Email: quinn@council.nyc.ny.us
Fax: 212-564-7347
Phone: 212-564-7757

 
             
  45 West 67th Street New York, NY 10023 (212) 496-8110 F:(212) 875-0209 landmarkwest@landmarkwest.org